You've cut your cancer risk. In a study of more than 14,800 women, those who had the highest levels of aerobic fitness were 55 percent less likely to die from breast cancer than those who were sedentary. Women considered moderately fit had about a 33 percent lower risk of developing the disease. Exercise may also help protect against endometrial, lung, and ovarian cancer, researchers say.
“Being active as we age can play a role in cognitive function, and reduce the risk of disease such as dementia and Alzheimer's,” says Amanda Paluch, a postdoctoral researcher at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “Research has explored several mechanisms, finding that exercise can increase synaptic plasticity and strength of nerve impulses in the brain, and have a positive effect on the hippocampus.”
Stubborn arm fat can make it difficult to wear short-sleeved tops comfortably due to poor fit or poor self-image. Although you cannot spot-reduce fat from the body, you can lose arm fat by adopting a healthy lifestyle, committing to an exercise routine and eating a nutritious diet. Schedule cardio five times per week, and strength-training three times per week, to slim down your arms.
To do the Scapular Wall Hold Reps, stand with your back relaxing against the wall and your feet about six inches away. Bend your arms and drive your elbows back into the wall. With your body in a nice straight line, drive off the wall with your elbows, pressing your chest out and pinching your shoulder blades down and back. Brace your core and squeeze your glutes so your body moves as one unit.

Research is finding that as we age, exercise may be able to help keep our brains healthy. Three studies presented at the 2015 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference showed that regular exercise may play an important role in protecting your brain from Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, and may help improve brain function and symptoms such as depression or anxiety in those who have these conditions.


A While using weights are one of the most effective ways of losing arm fat, it comes with the worry of whether your muscles would bulk up. While this is a common concern, building muscles doesn’t happen overnight and takes hours of intensive workout at a gym. If you, however, still concerned, you can lose flabby arms by opting for exercises that don’t include weights. Exercises such as pushups can help in this case, since you will use your own body weight to tone your arms. Tricep dips will also help you lose flabby arms without bulking up. Yoga is another great alternative.
Relax back into against the wall, keeping your body in a nice straight line from your head to your heels. Do not let your hips drop. Then repeat the press out, driving off your elbows. Do not arch your low back as you press out. Also, make sure not to shrug your shoulders. The further from the wall that you walk your feet out, the harder the move will be.

Below, you’ll find a core workout you can do at home, which was created by TruFusion trainer Alyssa West. Working all the muscles in your midsection—including the obliques (the muscles on the side of your body), rectus abdominis (what you think of as “abs”), transverse abdominis (your deepest internal core muscles), and yes, your glutes—is important for many reasons. “Working the [core] helps you maintain balance, good posture, and an overall strong [body],” says West. A solid core gives you a strong and sturdy foundation, which will help you move better in everyday life and be more successful in lifting heavier and pursuing other fitness-related goals. After all, most movements you do require some sort of core engagement to keep you stable, so the stronger these muscles are, the better.

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10. It enhances emotional well-being. Most people report that they feel calm and have a sense of well-being after they exercise. Exercise, according to one theory, releases beta-endorphin, a natural substance in the body that is hundreds of times more potent than morphine. Another theory points to serotonin as the cause of the exercise high. Increased levels of serotonin in the central nervous system are associated with feelings of well-being, heightening of appetite, and lessening of mental depression. The weight loss that accompanies exercise can also cause people to feel better about themselves.
Try tennis or another racket sport. Racket sports like tennis or squash are great for building arm muscles and for a total body workout. Join a recreational tennis league in your area or take tennis lessons from the tennis pro at your gym. If a family member enjoys playing squash or racquetball, ask them to give you lessons and practice your skills. You should notice marked improvements in your arm strength and better arm muscle definition the more you play racket sports.
Push-ups aren’t everyone’s cup of tea, but when you’re trying to get rid of that excess arm fat, they’re a pretty killer workout. Push-ups not only tone your biceps and triceps, they’re a great way to build muscle on your chest, making you feel stronger and look leaner in the process. If the thought of doing traditional plank push-ups has you feeling nervous, try doing the same motion at a 45-degree angle against a wall; you’ll get a similar workout, but without the intensity of a traditional push-up.

For urban runners and power-walkers, one of the biggest obstacles is other people. It’s difficult to get in your meditative zone and enjoy your music when you constantly have to dodge people. To resolve this vexing issue, Runbell, a startup in Tokyo, has developed the runner’s version of the bicycle bell. With this lightweight brass bell warning people you’re approaching from behind, you’re free to maintain your transcendental state while continuing your workout. Head to their Kickstarter campaign to pledge your support.

Exercise has long been correlated with a longer life, but it’s only recently started to become clear why this might be. Studies, like a new one in the journal Preventive Medicine which found that exercise is linked to longer caps at the ends of chromosomes, have helped flesh this out a bit more. These caps, called telomeres, naturally shorten as we age, with each cell division. People who live a long time have telomeres that are in better shape than those who don’t—but there’s a lot we can do to affect the rate at which they shorten over the years. The team behind the new study looked at data from CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and found that for people who exercised regularly, their telomeres were 140 base pairs longer on average than sedentary people's. Which correlates to being years “younger” than their sedentary peers.

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