When she's working out sans equipment, Marraccini's favorite exercises are all things core-related. "A strong core never goes out of style," says Marraccini. This makes sense, considering that having a strong and stable core is essential for both everyday movements as well as exercising. While regular crunches really only target the upper portion of your abdominals, runner's crunches work your entire core as you sit all the way up, including your obliques, lower back, hip flexor muscles, and rectus abdominis (which is what you probably think of when you think "six-pack" muscles).
Harrison is also a hardcore burpee devotee. "It's a full-body exercise that will get your heart rate up, and it can be progressed and regressed in a variety of ways," she explains. (Psst—here are nine ways to do a burpee, no matter what your level is.) But her go-to burpee has a twist: "I also really love mountain climbers for some of the same reasons, so why not combine them?" The combo of the two will skyrocket your heart rate for a major cardio challenge.
You can also pair this workout with weight lifting in the gym to really work on building muscle. Some great arm toning exercises are simple exercises like triceps dips, pull-ups, and biceps curls. You can learn how to do these in our article on how to get cut arms. You can even do some rowing to get an intense workout for all of your arm muscles. If you want to take cardio up a notch to shed arm fat faster, check out our fat loss workout video that will get you on your way to getting shredded.

Most people end a tough workout with a hot shower, but maybe we should be breaking out the colored pencils instead. A heart-pumping gym session can boost creativity for up to two hours afterwards Exercise enhances creativity independently of mood. Steinberg H, Sykes EA, Moss T, Lowery S, LeBoutillier N, Dewey A. The British Journal of Sports Medicine. 1997 September;31(3):240-245.. Supercharge post-workout inspiration by exercising outdoors and interacting with nature (see benefit #4) The cognitive benefits of interacting with nature. Berman, M.G., Jonides, J., Kaplan, S. Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Psychological Science, 2008 Dec;19(12):1207-12.. Next time you need a burst of creative thinking, hit the trails for a long walk or run to refresh the body and the brain at the same time.
A combination of aerobic workouts (which, depending on your fitness level, can include walking, running, swimming, and other vigorous heart-pumping exercise) and strength training (weight lifting, resistance training) is considered best for heart health. These exercises improve the muscles’ ability to draw oxygen from the circulating blood. That reduces the need for the heart—a muscular organ itself—to work harder to pump more blood to the muscles, whatever your age.
Do the standing "V" raise. The standing "V" raise can help you burn fat while working your shoulder muscles. Pick up a dumbbell with each hand and stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Start with your arms at your sides and slowly raise them upwards in a diagonal "V" shape. Keep your arms straight and bring them up until they are parallel to the floor. Hold this pose for one second, then lower your arms. Do 2-3 sets of 12-15 reps.[3]
Not feeling up to heavy lifting? Try doing more reps at a lower weight instead and you’ll be kissing that arm fat goodbye in no time. Researchers at Canada’s McMaster University studied a group of 20-something men over a 12-week period, with half the study subjects lifting heavy weight and doing low reps, and another group lifting lighter weights for higher reps. The Journal of Applied Physiology study found that both groups increased their strength and muscle size by approximately the same amount, so if you’re relatively new to lifting or don’t feel up to hitting the heavy weights just yet, don’t worry; lighter lifts will still help you ditch the fat while gaining muscle tone.

1. It strengthens the heart. The heart is a muscle. Like other muscles, its performance improves when it's regularly challenged by exercise. The heart responds to exercise by becoming stronger and more efficient. Strengthening the heart muscle can help ward off heart disease -- the leading cause of death in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services -- even in early childhood.
Check out our Nutrition Calculator, where you can plug in all your information and it'll spit out the right number of calories and macronutrients you should be consuming to hit your goals. If you need help using the calculator, take a look at our video tutorial that shows you how to enter all of your information to get the right metrics. If you get that nutrition on point for an extended period of time, you will lose body fat in general which will lead to you losing the fat on your arms.
The workout below, created by Jess Sims, NASM-certified personal trainer and instructor at Classpass Live, Shadowbox, and Fhitting Room in New York City, challenges your entire body and doesn't require a single piece of equipment. "It’s a full-body, dynamic workout that includes strength, power, mobility, and cardio," Sims says. "It’s also great because it’s customizable—if you have less than 20 minutes, you can do the circuit one time, or if you have more than 20 minutes you can do it three times."
The biggest issue most people face in terms of the appearance of their arms isn’t a lack of muscle definition, it’s excess fat, meaning that what you’re eating is as crucial for fixing the problem as the amount you’re exercising. Instead of grabbing an electrolyte drink after your workout, try adding some grapefruit juice to your routine; researchers at Vanderbilt University found that obese study subjects who sipped a half-cup serving of grapefruit juice before meals significantly reduced their weight and BMI when compared to those who drank water instead. Fortunately, when you lose fat, it disappears all over your body, so a few sips of real grapefruit juice —the fresh, no sugar added stuff— can help you ditch those batwings for good.

First things first. You cannot—I repeat you CANNOT—lose body fat without eating a good, clean, nutritious diet. This might be the hardest part for most people to hear, but you’ll never succeed unless you change what goes into your mouth. And while it may seem like a daunting task, it is probably much more simple than you think. The key is to eat real food! Put simply:


Exhale as you raise your body back to the starting position. Do this gently and slowly so you do not hyperextend your shoulders. Be sure to retract your shoulder blades and keep your shoulders square and stabilized (not rolled forward or up). As soon as it is difficult to hold your shoulders still and pulled back, stop the range of motion. This is 1 rep. Repeat this exercise for 2 sets of 10 reps. You should feel your tricep muscles working after 2 sets of this exercise.
HOW TO DO IT: Stand with your feet together and hold both arms straight in front of you, palms together. Jump your feet apart, push your hips back, bend your knees and lower into a squat while pulling your arms apart and squeezing your shoulder blades together. Shift your weight over your right leg, and then your left leg, then right and left again before returning back to center and standing back up. Gradually increase your speed and range of motion throughout the set.

Harrison is also a hardcore burpee devotee. "It's a full-body exercise that will get your heart rate up, and it can be progressed and regressed in a variety of ways," she explains. (Psst—here are nine ways to do a burpee, no matter what your level is.) But her go-to burpee has a twist: "I also really love mountain climbers for some of the same reasons, so why not combine them?" The combo of the two will skyrocket your heart rate for a major cardio challenge.

While some women worry about the size of their hips, belly or thighs, other women feel that they have fat arms. Do your arms look as tight and firm as you'd like them to? If they don't, you're not alone. Almost all women struggle with some degree of flabbiness in their upper body and some of us even spend hours at the gym trying to lose arm fat or flabbiness in the upper back. 


You’ve recently tried on a strapless dress and noticed that your arms are looking soft and flabby. Having excess fat on your arms can cause self-consciousness about showing off your upper body. You aren’t doomed to a lifetime of long-sleeved shirts. It is not possible to target one area of your body for fat loss, but decreasing your total body fat percentage will give your arms a slimmer appearance. You can quickly trim inches off your arms with diet and exercise.
Many people hit the gym or pound the pavement to improve cardiovascular health, build muscle, and of course, get a rockin’ bod, but working out has above-the-neck benefits, too. For the past decade or so, scientists have pondered how exercising can boost brain function. Regardless of age or fitness level (yup, this includes everyone from mall-walkers to marathoners), studies show that making time for exercise provides some serious mental benefits. Get inspired to exercise by reading up on these unexpected ways that working out can benefit mental health, relationships, and lead to a healthier and happier life overall.
Exercise has long been correlated with a longer life, but it’s only recently started to become clear why this might be. Studies, like a new one in the journal Preventive Medicine which found that exercise is linked to longer caps at the ends of chromosomes, have helped flesh this out a bit more. These caps, called telomeres, naturally shorten as we age, with each cell division. People who live a long time have telomeres that are in better shape than those who don’t—but there’s a lot we can do to affect the rate at which they shorten over the years. The team behind the new study looked at data from CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and found that for people who exercised regularly, their telomeres were 140 base pairs longer on average than sedentary people's. Which correlates to being years “younger” than their sedentary peers.
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