Mediterranean diet: Traditional cuisine of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea, shown to reduce the risk for heart disease, diabetes, some cancers and dementia. On the menu: Plenty of fruits, vegetables and beans, along with olive oil, nuts, whole grains, seafood; moderate amounts of low-fat yogurt, low-fat cheese and poultry; small amounts of red meat and sweets; and wine, in moderation, with meals.
We get it: You're busy! Career, family, friends, travel, that book club pick you still haven't checked out of the library (much less finished). With all that's going on, it can be tough to make time to hit the gym. Thankfully, you don’t need to go to the gym to achieve fabulously toned arms. Below are some of our favorite arm exercises for women that will help you tone your arm muscles and lose arm fat without weights — on your time. Say goodbye to flabby arms!
Now that you know spot-reducing doesn’t work, let’s talk about what does. Like we said earlier, body fat is distributed in many places on your body and you lose body fat gradually all over as you make good choices to eat clean and exercise using both cardio and strength training. REMEMBER, you can change the shape of your arms as you lose the fat and work on arm strength exercises designed to tone and shape your biceps, triceps and shoulders. When all of these things are happening the sloppy, saggy fat begins to be replaced with toned, shapely arms. Let’s get down to the details you need to make this happen!
Though there are many ways in which you can improve the appearance of your arms, we need to let you in on a little secret — arm fat is totally normal — especially with regards to women! The reason for this is quite natural, as women have higher levels of estrogen, which means there is a physiological need for some extra fat to remain healthy (actually, a whole 6-11% more fat than men). This fat is particularly useful for women who are expecting, as it ensures that the baby has enough reserves to sustain itself.
Poorly toned triceps -- the muscles on the backs of the arms -- can cause arms to be loose and jiggly. Tone up this area with standing overhead triceps extensions. Hold a light weight in your left hand with your arm straight above your head, elbow by your ear. Keep your upper arm still as you bend the elbow and forearm to bring the weight behind your head. Return to start position and repeat 10 to 12 times or until fatigue sets in. Repeat on the right arm and complete three sets in total per arm.
It is very difficult to engage in exercise when other health concerns are at play. If exercise is very difficult with your present state, focus on eating right. Most weight loss specialists agree that weight loss has more to do with diet (up to 95% diet) versus exercise. Take a look at this article for advice: http://www.wikihow.com/Develop-Healthy-Eating-Habits
Could the key to being more productive and happier at work lie in exercise? One study thinks so. It found that those employees who worked out before work or during their lunch hour reported feeling less stress and being happier and more productive than days when they skipped a workout. (11) Not only that, but they also performed better on exercise days. It’s the perfect excuse for a lunchtime stroll or walking meeting.
Step forward with the left foot and lower into a lunge, keeping the front knee behind the toe. Push into the heel to step back and immediately step out to the left and into a squat. Press back to start and take the left leg back into a reverse lunge, again keeping the front knee behind the toe. Bring the left leg back to start and repeat for all reps before switching sides.
Endorphins, amiright? The link between exercise and happiness has been well-studied, and the results are very positive (just like you’ll be after some gym time). One study from the University of Vermont found that just 20 minutes of exercise can boost your mood for 12 hours. Cardio and strength training can both give you a lift, and 30-60 minutes of exercise three to five days a week is optimal for mood benefits, according to the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.
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