Stand in a side lunge position with one leg bent parallel to the floor and the other leg straight to the side. Jump up explosively as you switch legs. Now the previously straight leg will be bent and the previously bent leg will be straight to the other side. Try and keep your core tight and stay as low as possible as you switch sides as fast as you can.

Before we look at what we can do for reducing arm fat, let’s be sure to understand the most common misconception about weight loss that is still floating around out there: spot-reducing. Science says you can’t spot reduce body fat. That means you can’t pick a spot on your body and exercise the fat away. You see, you store fat cells all over your body. Where your fat cells happen to be more concentrated is often a genetic predisposition. Having more fat on your arms doesn’t mean you can lose the fat directly from your arms alone. It means you have to first lose body fat all over, and then work on specifically strengthening your arms to tone them the way you wish.
Exercise has long been correlated with a longer life, but it’s only recently started to become clear why this might be. Studies, like a new one in the journal Preventive Medicine which found that exercise is linked to longer caps at the ends of chromosomes, have helped flesh this out a bit more. These caps, called telomeres, naturally shorten as we age, with each cell division. People who live a long time have telomeres that are in better shape than those who don’t—but there’s a lot we can do to affect the rate at which they shorten over the years. The team behind the new study looked at data from CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and found that for people who exercised regularly, their telomeres were 140 base pairs longer on average than sedentary people's. Which correlates to being years “younger” than their sedentary peers.
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