If you fall into the second camp, there is plenty you can do to minimize the risk of the prediabetes progressing to diabetes. What's needed is a ''lifestyle reset," says Jill Wiesenberger, MD, RDN, CDE, FAND, a certified health and wellness coach and certified diabetes educator in Newport News, Virginia, and author of Prediabetes: A Complete Guide.2  The new book is published in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association.
Type 2 diabetes can lead to a number of complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, as well as cardiovascular disease. It also means cells are not receiving the glucose they need for healthy functioning. A calculation called a HOMA Score (Homeostatic Model Assessment) can tell doctors the relative proportion of these factors for an individual with type 2 diabetes. Good glycemic control (that is, keeping sugar/carbohydrate intake low so blood sugar isn't high) can prevent long-term complications of type 2 diabetes. A diet for people with type 2 diabetes also is referred to as a diabetic diet for type 2 diabetes and medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for people with diabetes.
To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says.
As a renal dietitian my focus can’t be solely on diabetes. Although a very large percentage of our patients with chronic kidney disease are here due to unmanaged blood sugar control, that is just one of our problems. I have to prioritize my counseling in other ways – the most important being control of potassium, then sodium (fluid), protein and phosphorus.
Another essential element of Crawford's new lifestyle: her new food philosophy. "If you want something good for yourself, it's worth the time to invest in cooking," she says of her switch from eating out to staying in. "I let go of the processed foods and rely on foods as a whole. Everything we need is in our backyard." Crawford, now 30, tries to eat seasonally, makes fresh produce the center of her meals, and prefers organic food over conventional.
Prediabetes means a person's blood glucose (sugar) level is higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as diabetes. If you have prediabetes, you are at increased risk for developing serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes, stroke and heart disease. The sooner people find out they have prediabetes and take action, the better their chances of preventing type 2 diabetes.

If you have found that your fasting blood glucose is rising over time, even if it is normal, and certainly if you "officially" have impaired glucose intolerance (pre-diabetes), strongly consider getting a home glucose meter and testing your own blood to see if you can determine which lifestyle changes help lower and stabilize your blood glucose. The only problem is that many insurance companies will not pay for this preventative step, and the test strips are admittedly expensive. Still, you might be able to afford to monitor yourself at least occasionally or find a diabetic friend who sometimes has extra strips. Tracking your blood glucose response to meals and over time can be a big help in preventing the progression of diabetes.

The glycemic index identifies foods that increase blood sugar rapidly. This handy tool allows you to favor foods that have much less effect on blood sugar. High-glycemic-index foods include sugar itself, white potatoes, most wheat flour products, and most cold cereals, e.g., pumpernickel, rye, multigrain, or sourdough bread, old-fashioned oatmeal, bran cereals, grape-nuts, most fruits, sweet potatoes, pasta, rice, barley, couscous, beans, peas, lentils, most vegetables [Table 1].

A neck lump or nodule is the most common symptom of thyroid cancer. You may feel a lump, notice one side of your neck appears to be different, or your doctor may find it during a routine examination. If the tumor is large, it may cause neck or facial pain, shortness of breath, difficulty swallowing, cough unrelated to a cold, hoarseness or voice change.


Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
A growing body of evidence links moderate alcohol consumption with reduced risk of heart disease. The same may be true for type 2 diabetes. Moderate amounts of alcohol—up to a drink a day for women, up to two drinks a day for men—increases the efficiency of insulin at getting glucose inside cells. And some studies indicate that moderate alcohol consumption decreases the risk of type 2 diabetes. (8, 46–51) If you already drink alcohol, the key is to keep your consumption in the moderate range, as higher amounts of alcohol could increase diabetes risk. (52) If you don’t drink alcohol, there’s no need to start—you can get the same benefits by losing weight, exercising more, and changing your eating patterns.

If your mood, sleep, blood sugar, and energy are being affected, limiting intake may be advised. The most important thing when choosing coffee for people with diabetes or those managing their weight is to pay attention to the carbohydrate content from milk and added sweeteners. Cutting back or eliminating artificial sweeteners is advised as these have shown to disrupt gut bacteria, cause cravings and overeating, and negatively impact weight and blood sugar management.


Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association.
If you eliminate concentrated sources of carbohydrates (foods that turn into sugar in your blood stream) like candy and cookies, you may be able to reduce or eliminate the need for diabetes medications. Everyone with type 2 diabetes will benefit from an improved diet, but you may still need other interventions, such as increased physical activity, weight loss or medications to keep your blood sugars in the target range. Check with your doctor about any diabetes medication dose adjustments that may be required if you change your diet.
In this country, we tend to over- do it on those. Most people do not enjoy measuring their foods or counting carbs. My favorite way to estimate portion sizes is to use the “Create Your Plate” method created by the America Diabetes Association. Simply use a disposable plate divided into three sections (one half-plate section and two quarter plate sections). The large, half plate section should be used for non-starchy vegetables, things like carrots, broccoli, or cauliflower. Place your lean meat or protein in one quarter-plate section, and your carbohydrate in the other quarter-plate section. You can practice designing your meal using this method on their website: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/create-your-plate/
More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. (1) In 2007, diabetes cost the U.S. an estimated $116 billion in excess medical spending, and an additional $58 billion in reduced productivity. (1) If the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its present rate, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States will increase from about 16 million in 2005 to 48 million in 2050. (2) Worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes will rise from 285 million in 2010 to 439 million in the year 2030. (3)
#6. VINEGAR—Sprinkled on your salad, roasted vegetables, and other foods, vinegar may improve your blood sugar and insulin when you're planning to eat a high-carb meal. In a small study, researchers gave those who had unhealthy insulin sensitivity a drink of apple cider vinegar and water before a high-carb meal and found it helped increase their insulin sensitivity and normalize blood sugar levels. 8
Perhaps you have learned that you have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. You might be overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Maybe you had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. These are just a few examples of factors that can raise your chances of developing type 2 diabetes.
The process of type 2 diabetes begins years or even decades before the diagnosis of diabetes, with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the beginning of the body not dealing well with sugar, which is the breakdown product of all carbohydrates. Insulin tells certain body cells to open up and store glucose as fat. When the cells stop responding your blood sugar rises, which triggers the release of more insulin in a vicious cycle. Insulin resistance is associated with abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and low HDL ("good cholesterol"). When these occur together, it is known as metabolic syndrome or pre-diabetes. It is a risk factor for heart disease and type 2 diabetes.
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